Is a Dropship Business Worth It?

I’ve heard a lot of horror stories about dropshipping and it made me do more research about it. You see, the most common reason why people fail in this kind of business is that they fail to prepare on one of the important aspects of it. As with any business, preparation is critical and making sure that even those simple steps are taken cared of will mean the success of your business.

I visited a forum the other day and there was one guy who said his dropship business failed and he is not recommending the business model ever. He said it’s a bad business to get in to and you’ll lose money on it, no questions asked.

So I sent him a message asking him about what happened and how a supposedly good business model failed him. It turned out that he was partnered with a lousy dropshipper and he was not prepared enough to answer customer service questions. You see, with a dropship business, you still have to take care of your customers, it’s not a set and forget thing that will make you money even while you sleep.

Dropshipping is a real business with real customer interaction and real hands on experience. Of course, minus the inventory and physical stuff but all the other business aspects are still there.

During our conversation I was leading him to think about what happened and to re-assess everything and think who really is to blame about his failure. In the end, he said, you’re probably right, the business model was not the problem, I’ve always thought a dropship business would make rich, and it was me who screwed up. I’m not sure but after our conversation, I’m thinking he’s out there setting up a dropship business all over again.

So in my opinion, any business, be it a dropship business, an affiliate marketing business, or even a good old brick and mortar business is well worth it if you prepare well and you’re ready to take on the challenge. Go for it full blast, with all your heart and all your might and I’m sure everything will be perfect.

How Much is My Business Worth?

If you are considering selling your small business, it will be important for you to evaluate your business in order to derive a reasonable asking price. Experts recommend that you assess the business from more than one angle in order to obtain an accurate picture of how much your business is worth.

Rules of Thumb Methodology

Begin by analyzing the history of your business to determine how much profit the business has been earning in excess of your own salary and benefits. Project future data based on your specific history, as well as general market trends to establish if the past is a fair representation of the future. This is typically known as “Rules of Thumb” methodology.

Market and Industry Trends

In examining trends, it is necessary to consider such items as supplier price changes, competition, and how the particular industry is performing. Also, take a look at prices paid recently for comparable companies in similar locations. Additionally, compare your company’s year-end gross profit and operating income to other industry competitors. If your company is closer to the top of the range in profitability, you can command a higher price for your business.

Owner Benefits

Then investigate the value of your business by using the Multiple Method; a pre-determined multiple (usually between 1 and 3) multiplied by the earnings of the business. The earnings or “Owner Benefits” amount can typically be used as an effective basis. This number is the total funds that you can foresee being available from the business based on past experience. The value is derived by adding the owner’s salary and benefits to the business’s profits; then adding back non-cash expenses.

The multiple that is used is mainly based on the industry. It is usually one time the value calculated if the business owner is the entire business, such as consulting or freelance services. Businesses with a solid customer base and more than 3 years in business most likely will be worth 3 times the basis.

ROI

Another calculation that should be looked at is the Return on Investment (ROI) that a buyer could expect to receive if they purchase your business. This is calculated simply as Gain from Investment minus Cost of Investment divided by Cost of Investment.

Assets

In addition, take into consideration the value of the business’ assets. This includes inventory and equipment.

Overall, it is important to keep accurate financial records. Buyers seeking financing to purchase your business will need to present information to back up the price being paid for the business.

How Much is Your Business Worth? Value It With a Business Valuation Calculator

Valuation Potential

There are more than 10 ways to value your business. Each method will provide you with a slightly different answer. One of the more common methods that business brokers use is to value your business is based on how much cash the business will generate in the long term. Business brokers then discount this cash to today’s value. This allows Business brokers to gain a clear understanding of the value of the business in today’s value.

With online calculators assumptions need to be made in order to generate a valuation figure. Given the value of your business profit, we then need to understand how much actual cash you have available in the business. Probably the largest player to impact upon this level of cash is the tax man. The tax man unfortunately wants a significant slice of your profits. When your business therefore earns a profit of $100,000 you effectively only end up with a lesser amount in the bank, as cash after you have paid your tax bill.

The other major assumption that needs to be made, is what we call the “weighted cost of capital”. This might be more simply referred to as the risk of lending money to the business. If your business is a low risk proposition and your future income is guaranteed then this figure would be down at around 4%. However for most small businesses there is a high degree of risk that earnings will remain constant over the next 10 years, so we apply a risk factor of 15-20% or even greater for higher risk enterprises.

With online business valuation calculator, the model calculates your sales and profits over the next 10 years and then discounts this by the “weighted cost of capital” rate.

There are many more factors that could be taken into account including capital injections and expenditures, depreciation and even whether the owners of the business are being paid a fair salary.

Online Business Valuation calcutors can provide an indicative valuation of a business by using discounted cash flow and weighted cost of capital.